Noun clause "のが"

Hi... I have a bit of a problem here: When it comes to chaining verbs together, is there any special form that must be used besides the clause itself? The example phrase クリスマスの贈り物買い物するのが走り回っていたばかり neither returns "was just running around shopping for Christmas gifts" in Google's translation (instead it seems to treat "the gift" itself as the subject of the sentence) and I can't find anything even remotely close - contextually speaking - in the regular search engine. And is there a type of sentence in which ”のが” can't be used?
posted by xMakoReactantx

Comments 4

  • shairn
    shairn
    贈り物を買って走り回っていたばかり should do the trick. To chain verbs, you must use the te form. You shouldn't use の with する since there already is a noun before する - just remove する. I honestly don't see the need to use のが in that sentence. The の particle used after a verb(not a する verb) turns the verb group into a noun clause which can then be used as the object or subject of a verb.
  • jturningpin
    jturningpin
    >I honestly don't see the need to use のが in that sentence.

    Then you probably shouldn't be commenting, because this is basic grammar. Sorry to sound like a jerk, but it is what it is.

    のが is used, as is mentioned at the top of this thread, to nominalize a verb phrase. する is "to do," so in クリスマスの贈り物買い物するのが走り回っていたばかり it means, "In/When shopping for Christmas presents, [I] did nothing but run [around the place]."

    To use another example:
    食べる - To eat
    食べるのが - [The act of] eating
    食べるのが大好き - I really like/love eating - As in the book by the same name: http://www.amazon.co.jp/食べるのが大好き-鳩山-エミリ/dp/4062106973

    So, yeah.
  • shairn
    shairn
    I know the use of のが for nominalizing a verb to affect an adjective, but I had no idea it could be used that way with verbs. Thanks for clarifying.
  • jturningpin
    jturningpin
    No worries, sorry if I sound like a jerk when I post. I'm an old, tired man. :/
xMakoReactantx

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